The criminals

  Dr. Theodore John Kaczynski
  Henry McCarty
  Gary Gilmore
  Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy Floyd”
  Clyde Chestnut Barrow
  John Gotti
  Charles “Lucky” Luciano
  Ted Bundy
  Elizabeth Bathory
  Jeffrey Dahmer
  John Wayne Gacy
  Jesse James
  Charles “Charlie” Manson
  Al Capone

Dr. Theodore John Kaczynski
“Unabomber”
An American mathematician from the University of Michigan and social critic, who sent several deadly mail bombings to make a political stance on the erosion of human freedom requiring modern technologies by large scale organization. It was after Kaczynsk put a bomb in the cargo hold of American Airlines Flight 144 on 15 November 1979 that the FBI became involved. On 24 April 1995 Kaczynsk wrote to the New York Times promising to “desist from terrorism” if the Times published his manifesto, Industrial Society and Its Future. Kaczynsk’s brother recognized his style of writing from the manifesto and alerted the FBI. Later, he pleaded guilty and was sentenced life in prison with no possibility of parole.

Henry McCarty,
“Billy the Kid”
Henry McCarty, also known as “Billy the Kid” (23 November, 1859 – 14 July, 1881) was a 19th century American frontier outlaw and gunman who participated in the Lincoln County War. As the legend says, he killed over 20 white men and numerous Mexicans and Indians. At the young age of 14 McCarty had become an orphan, and left Arizona to New Mexico after killing a black smith; it was there he got the name “Billy the Kid.” After running from the law, and escaping from prison twice, McCarty was shot and killed 3 months after his second escape by the Sheriff of Lincoln County. McCarty had the qualities of both a notorious outlaw and beloved folk hero, a year later after his death McCarty was also known as a legend. His killer, Sheriff Pat Garret, along with a co-author published a biography entitled The Authentic Life of Billy, the Kid, which grew into a symbolism of the American Old West.

Gary Gilmore


Gary Gilmore (4 December, 1940 – 17 January, 1977) was an American criminal and spree killer and is known as the first person executed in the United States. Gilmore started challenging the law at an early age as a teenager, in his hometown of Texas. His first arrest was in 1962 and he was sent to the Oregon State Penitentiary for armed robbery and assault. Years later in 1976, Gilmore was let out on parole and went to Utah to live with a cousin. However, in the same year he robbed and murdered two employees at a gas station, even after they complied with his demands. Shortly after, Gilmore’s cousin turned him in to the police and he was charged with the murders. Gilmore was found guilty for the killings and given the death sentence of being gunned down, while being strapped to a chair.

Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy Floyd”
Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy Floyd” (3 February, 1904 – 22 October, 1934) was an American bank robber and killer, whose crimes gained heavy media press coverage in the 1930’s. Floyd grew up in Oklahoma and spent most of his time in nearby cities. St. Louis, Missouri is where at 21 years-old he was first arrested for a payroll robbery. Following parole, Floyd joined with more established criminals in Kansas City and committed numerous bank robberies over the next several years. The nickname “Pretty Boy” came from a payroll master when he described how the three robbers looked. Between 1929 and 1934 Floyd encountered several arrests, escaped from prison and was the primary suspect for the Kansas City Massacre, a gunfight that resulted in the deaths of four law officers. Floyd’s criminal run abruptly ended when he was killed in 1934 near East Liverpool, Ohio, while being pursued by a local law officer and FBI agents.

Clyde Chestnut Barrow


Clyde Chestnut Barrow (24 March, 1909 – 23 May, 1934) was born in Ellis County, Texas. He was the fifth of seven children, from a poor farming family, that emigrated as a result of the impoverished nearby farms in West Dallas. In late 1926, Clyde had his first arrest over a late return on a rental car. Although, he had legitimate jobs, he cracked safes, robbed stores, and stole cars. After numerous arrests in 1928 and 1929, he was sent to Eastham Prison Farm, where he had his first killing. In February 1932, Clyde was paroled and the gang who consisted of Clyde, his brother (Marvin Barrow) and Bonnie Parker continued with robberies, many of which were banks. Barrow’s goal became to seek revenge against the Texas prison for the abuses he suffered while serving time. After a few years of running from criminal justice, Bonnie and Clyde were killed on May 23, 1934, on an isolated road in Louisiana. Six Officers shot the couple in daylight, in a stolen automobile.

John Gotti


John Gotti, Jr. (27 October, 1940 – 10 June, 2002) was the Boss of the Gambino crime family after the murder of the previous boss Paul Castellono. John Gotti was the most powerful crime boss of his era and his highly outspoken personality and style is what became the cause of his ruin. By the media, he was known as “The Dapper Don” because he wore expensive clothes and “The Teflon Don” because the majority of attempts to convict him resulted in either a hung jury or it was acquitted. In the early stages of Gotti’s criminal career he worked with the Gambino family. The FBI eventually put Gotti under electronic surveillance and on December 11, 1990 New York City detectives arrested Gotti and the Gambino family. In 1992, Gotti was convicted of 13 counts of murder, conspiracy to commit murder, loansharking, racketeering, obstruction of justice, illegal gambling and tax evasion. He was sent to the Penitentiary of Marion, Illinois, where he was sentenced to life in prison and died of throat cancer.

Charles “Lucky” Luciano


Charles “Lucky” Luciano (24 November, 1897 – 26 January 1962) was a Christian Sicilain-born American mobster. Luciano was considered the father of modern organized crime in America. Along with his associate Meyer Lanksy, he played an active role in the development of the “National Crime Syndicate” in the United States. Throughout his involvement in the Five Points Gang during 1921, Luciano became apart of high-profit bootlegging operation. At an early age, he worked his way up to being aside Giuseppe “Joe the Boss” Masseria, who was apart of the Castellammarese War (1928 – 1932). During 1929, Luciano cut a deal with Masseria’s enemy Maranzano, to kill Masseria in return for being made second-in-command. Luciano’s reign was relatively short-lived, as he was in convicted or organized large prostitution in America. During World War II he made a deal with the government and was deported to Sicily where he continued with mafia operations.

Ted Bundy


Ted Bundy, born Theodore Robert Cowell (24 November, 1946 – 24 January, 1989), was an American serial killer active between 1973 and 1978. Bundy graduated in 1972 from University of Washington with a degree in psychology and went to work for the state Republican Party, where he posed as a college student. In the fall of 1973, Bundy enrolled in law school, but dropped out in spring 1974 at the same time a young woman began to disappear in the Pacific Northwest. After dating two women simultaneously, Bundy abruptly ended his early engagement and a few weeks after this breakup, Bundy began a murderous rampage in Washington State. Bundy’s earliest known, identified murders were committed in 1974, when he was 27. August of 1975, he was arrested for the first time for a female who had disappeared, but he escaped prison and fled to Florida, where he raped and murdered again. Bundy was captured and on January 24, 1989 he was executed in the electric chair at Florida State Prison in Starke, Florida.

Elizabeth Bathory


Elizabeth Bathory (7 August, 1560 – 21 August 1614) was a countess from the renowed Bathory family. She is remembered as the “Blood Countess” in Slovakia, where she spent the majority of her adult life as a serial killer. After her husband’s death Bathory and four assistants were accused of torturing and killing hundreds of girls and young women. The legend of her crimes suggests after killing her victims she would bath in the blood of virgins in order to retain her youth and inspired One of Braum Stoker’s Dracula. When authorities came to arrest Bathory and her servants, there were reports of one girl dead, one dying and other females were found locked up in the Castle. Although, Bathory was accused for over 600 murders she was only convicted for 80 and was placed under house arrest, where she remained until she died, four years later.

Jeffrey Dahmer


Jeffrey Dahmer (21 May, 1960 – 28 November, 1994) was one of America’s most notorious homicidal cannibals. He was born and raised in Wisconsin in a middle-class family. At an early age Dahmer had in interest in cutting up animals and also knew that he was a homosexual. Between 1978 and 1991 he murdered 17 men and boys, many of whom were of African and Asian descent. Dahmer’s murders were particularly gruesome, involving rape, torture, dismemberment and cannibalism. Dahmer’s killings ended on 22 July 1991 when his final victim, Tracy Edwards escaped and ran handcuffed to police. Following imprisonment at Columbia Correctional Institution, an inmate beat him to death.

John Wayne Gacy


John Wayne Gacy (17 March, 1942 – 10 May, 1994) was an American serial killer who raped and murdered at least 33 young men and boys. After getting a business degree, he moved to Iowa with his wife in 1964, where he became a manager of the local Kentucky Fried Chicken branch. However, at the end of 1968 Gacy was sent to the Iowa Penitentiary for 10 years for sodomizing two boys. After his release, Gacy moved to Chicago and remarried. Throughout, 1972 and 1978 he went on a killing spree and while some of his victims’ bodies were found in the Des Plaines River, he buried 26 of them in the small crawl space underneath the basement of his home. During trial Gacy confessed he had committed 25 to 30 murders and was executed by lethal injection.

Jesse James


Jesse James (15 September, 1847 – 3 April, 1882, son of a Baptist minister was the most renowned murderer and robber of his age. In 1864 Jesse and his brother Frank joined a guerrilla outfit led by “Bloody Bill.” He took part in the first armed robbery of the United States on 13 February 1866 in Liberty, Missouri. Jesse was a gang leader, bank and train robber, and murderer and became the most famous member of the James-Younger Gang. He was very well known in the media and Jesse did his best to portray himself and his gang as modern-day Robin Hoods. In 1882, he was shot in the back of the head by one of the trusted Ford Brothers and since then has become a legendary figure of the Wild West.

Charles “Charlie” Manson


Charles “Charlie” Manson (12 November, 1934) led what became known as the Manson Family in California in the late 1960’s. At one time, the Family consisted of 100 individuals at the Spahn Ranch, northwest of Los Angeles. Manson was referred to both as God and Satan by his followers. During Manson’s trial from 1970 to 1972 he was found guilty of conspiracy to commit the Tate/LaBianca murders, carried out by members of the group under his orders. Before the murders, he was becoming a part of the Los Angeles music industry, through association with Beach Boy, Dennis Wilson. After his arrest, recordings of songs written and performed by him were released commercially.

Al Capone


Alphonse “Al” Capone (17 January, 1899 – 25 January, 1947), was an American gangster who led a organized crime dedicated to smuggling and bootlegging of liquor and other illegal activities during the Prohibition Era of the 1920s and 1930s. Capone began his career in Brooklyn, where he dropped out of high school and became a part of small-time gangs, including The Junior Forty Thieves. In 1918 Capone married his girlfriend who was pregnant with their son. Shortly after, he moved to Chicago where his wife and son would join him. Although, Capone was never successfully convicted of racketeering charges, his mobster career ended in 1931 by federal government for income-tax evasion. Throughout his sentence, Capone went to a number of different prisons.

"Come and explore the best criminals"

Below is a list of criminals that have more information at our museum.


Adolf Hitler, Billy The Kid, Jesse James, John Wesly Hardin, Butch Kassidy and Sundance Kid, Lizzie Bordan, Herman Webster Mudget, John Wilkes Booth, Jack The Ripper, Machine Gun Kelly, Al Capone, John Dillinger, Pretty Boy Floyd, Baby Face Nelson, Joe Valachi, Bonnie & Clyde, Dutch Shultz, John Gotti, Bruno Hauptman, Black Beard, John Wayne Gacy, Lady Bathroy, Boston Strangular Son Of Sam, Jeffrey Dalmer, Albert Anastasia, Lucky Luciano, Bugsy Seigal, Charlie Manson, Unabomber, Tim McVie, Birdman of Alcatraz, Ted Bundy, Gary Gilmore, Jason, Freddy Kruger, Michael Myers, Leatherface.

2 New Criminal Sets added for 2012

Ed Theodore Gain and Richard ‘The Iceman’ Kuklinski, Two of this century’s most notable criminals.